Albert Camus “The Plague”: The new order

“Through this sudden setback of the plague was as welcome as it was unlooked for, our townsfolk where in no hurry to jubilate. While intensifying their desire to be set free, the terrible months they had lived through taught them prudence. and they had come to count less and less on a speedy end of the epidemic. All the same, this new development was the talk of the town and people began to nurse hopes the less heartfelt for being unavowed. All else took back place: that daily there were new victims counted for little beside that staggering fact: the weekly total showed a decrease. One of the signs that a return to the golden age of health was secretly awaited was that our fellow citizens, careful that they were not to voice their hope, now began to talk-in, it is true, a carefully detached tone-of the new order of life that would set in after the plague.”

Albert Camus (1913-1960) first published “The Plague” in 1947.

Published by Robert K Sephen (CSW)

Robert K Stephen writes about food and drink, travel, and lifestyle issues. He is one of the few non-national writers to be certified as a wine specialist by the Society of Wine Educators, in Washington, DC. Robert was the first associate member of the Wine Writers’ Circle of Canada. He also holds a Mindfulness Certification from the University of Leiden and the University of Toronto. Be it Spanish cured meat, dried fruit, BBQ, or recycled bamboo place mats, Robert endeavours to escape the mundane, which is why he has established this publication. His motto is, "Have Story, Will Write."

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